Weekly Wanderings: AHA FOMO Edition

▪ Four thousand historians descended on Denver this weekend for the annual American Historical Association (AHA) conference, but I wasn’t among them. Driven by a fear of missing out (FOMO), I went back and forth and back and forth about going to the conference, eventually deciding that I just don’t need to be there this … Continue reading Weekly Wanderings: AHA FOMO Edition

The Uncompromising Jill Lepore

I’ve mentioned here before my enormous history-geek fangirling for Harvard professor and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore. Lepore is an excellent example of someone who works inside and outside “the academy” (aka the university) with equal success, which is one of the reasons I have so much admiration for her (the other being the … Continue reading The Uncompromising Jill Lepore

The Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, Past and Present

I spent last weekend in Chicago attending the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS, shorthand for both the association and the annual meeting). On the night before I left for the conference, my boss handed me something she had found in her office—the program for the 1971 AAS. Promising to treat it … Continue reading The Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, Past and Present

Twelve Years a Graduate Student? Yes, Twelve

“Oh, you’re still in school?” I don’t think any doctoral student can refrain from cringing at this question. Friends, relatives, and airplane seatmates unfamiliar with the PhD process don’t always understand how unbounded it can be: it takes as long as it takes to get through coursework, pass a set of rigorous qualifying exams, draw … Continue reading Twelve Years a Graduate Student? Yes, Twelve